Every three years or so, the world’s greatest invisible actor Andy Serkis decides over morning coffee that the time is ripe to once more pretend that he is an ape. He then contacts director Matt Reeves, and a secret monastic order of computer wizards aid him in his quest. Critics and audience unite in their marvel at Hollywood’s thickening silver screen spellbook and the quiet brilliance of the man behind the monkey. Then, they forget Serkis and his associates, with nary a faux-obituary at the unfailingly disappointing Academy Awards.

Returning to school after a relaxing summer break is hard, and it can be easy to let the healthy practices you developed over the summer fall to the wayside once you’re back on campus. That’s where your phone comes in to save the day. With engaging graphics and daily challenges, these apps may feel like games but they can make a huge difference in encouraging you to keep healthy habits and maybe even avoid the next campus wide cold.

Five years after her second album “Warrior” was produced, Kesha, now going by her birth name instead of the stage name Ke$ha, released her album “Rainbow.” At the age of 30, the pop star, known for her 2009 hit song “Tik Tok,” produced this heartfelt comeback album, an homage to her triumph over the trauma she faced during her career. For the last five years, Kesha has fought for creative control of her music and sued her longtime producer, Dr.

WARNING: The following review contains spoilers for “Game of Thrones” Season 7.

Here is an article showcasing Latin American music that isn’t about “Despacito.” Call it North American artists exploiting Latin American sounds in yet another industry or call it cultural exchange, but these questions undoubtedly surround incredibly important issues, and for that we recommend you read Remezcla’s “A Conversation About Despacito, Justin Bieber, and the Exploitation of Latinos in the Music Industry” or Popcast’s “Latin Pop Thrives, No Bieber Required.” To center artists from across Latin America, we give you a mixture of classics and relatively new sounds in a belated summer

When I walked into a Santa Monica AMC to see the new comedy “Girls Trip,” I had just come off a long day at work at my internship in the area. I wasn’t in the mood for explosions, saving-the-world plots or quippy lines from bored, veteran movie stars clearly wishing they were somewhere else. The movie industry flooded this summer with particularly disappointing big-budget blockbusters with thin stories and little to offer besides attractive white faces and muddled CGI vomit.

An important part of keeping one’s sanity while at Amherst is remembering to get away from everything every once in a while. It’s easy to get consumed in the “Amherst Bubble,” especially in your first year. While the Office of Student Life and our plethora of student groups do provide many fun activities to do on weekends, there’s a lot of other options provided by the Five College Consortium as well as the Pioneer Valley in general. After three years at Amherst, here are some of the places I’ve frequented and some general advice on how to adventure outside of campus:

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