When it comes to adaptations, staying true to the source material is very difficult. Fortunately, “Sherlock” has always been good at navigating that particular problem, successfully translating Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s stories and characters in a modern way while adding its own particular twists. However, with Season 4, “Sherlock” seems to have fallen into the problem of spending so much time expanding the show that it leaves behind what made it so entertaining in the first place.

Until now, the works of legendary playwright August Wilson have not been adapted to film, which is quite surprising given their enormous popularity. “Fences,” Wilson’s most commercially successful play, finally came to the big screen this winter. After starring alongside Viola Davis in a 2010 Broadway revival of the play, which had originally been produced in 1983, Denzel Washington directed and starred in the 2016 film adaptation while Davis also reprised her lead role.

Warning: This article contains references to sexual assault and mental illness. This book review is also NOT spoiler free.

The only word that immediately comes to mind when I think about describing “The Vegetarian” is strange. At a mere 192 pages, it is not long, nor is it particularly difficult to read. Han Kang’s cerebral work is nowhere near as difficult to read as the coursework in upper-level philosophy courses might be. Yet, at the same time, I wouldn’t describe “The Vegetarian” as a light read, either.

Last week, indie-rock band Foxygen released their fourth official album, “Hang.” The album follows their popular 2013 album, “We Are the 21st Century Ambassadors of Peace & Magic,” and their less well-received 2014 album, “…And Star Power.” “Hang” is the title of the last track on their previous album. However, the relationship between the previous album and the most recent release does not seem so literal, in terms of content.

Released Nov. 11, “Arrival” is a science-fiction film based on Ted Chiang’s short story, “Story of Your Life,” The film, directed by Denis Villenueve (Prisoners, Sicario) and starring Amy Adams and Jeremy Renner is an absolute triumph.
“Arrival” is one of the best movies of the year; it is a thinking person’s science fiction film in the same vein as “Interstellar,” “2001: A Space Odyssey” and “Close Encounters of the Third Kind.”

Jonathan Jackson ’17 and Hoang Thu An ’18 participated in Visiting Professor Amanda Herman’s Five College advanced art seminar course: “Make it Public: Art and Social Practice” about socially engaged art. The course has students from all five colleges who were chosen by the art departments at their schools for their exemplary work. For the course, each student proposed and implemented an original social practice art project that explore themes of identity, gender, race, mental health, human perceptions, feelings and more.

Following his hit singles “Starboy,” “False Alarm,” “Party Monster” and “I Feel It Coming,” Canadian R&B singer, The Weeknd, has released his highly anticipated third studio album, “Starboy.” The album follows the wildly popular success of his last album “Beauty Behind the Madness,” and, like “Beauty,” “Starboy” seems to possess the right recipe for making the top charts. The Weeknd continues to move farther away from the dark, moody R&B of his “Trilogy” mixtapes and further into the realm of pop music. However, “Starboy” is by no means a bland, mainstream pop album.

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