It’s no secret that Marvel movies tend to fall into storytelling ruts. There will always be a love interest, a snarky hero, a big fight scene, a sequel hook, etc. So imagine my surprise when I saw “Doctor Strange,” and it turned out to be one of the most clever comic book movies with an impressive, definite awareness of the genre’s general shortcomings.

Directed by Kelly Reichardt and released this October, “Certain Women” pensively explores certain distinctively female experiences by presenting snippets of the lives of three women (played by Laura Dern, Michelle Williams and Kristen Stuart) living in the same, small town of Livingston, Montana. The film is set in the cloudy, washed-out, yellow-grey atmosphere of wintertime in Livingston, and its mostly silent score and slow pace makes it a largely visual, meditative film.

Whether it’s because of the conclusion of a stressful election or the conclusion of a stressful semester, we could all use a laugh right now. Unlike the “Harry Potter fandom” who had to wait five years for something new to be added to canon, Amherst students will only have to wait a month for some serious laughter. One of Amherst’s student-driven theater groups, Green Room, has currently been working on a parody of J.K. Rowling’s “Cursed Child,” the latest addition to the lineage of Harry Potter novels, which is formatted as a play.

Not having class isn’t enough to truly feel like you’re on a break from the hustle and bustle of college. Sometimes what you need to get away from the stress of the semester is to leave this world completely. My favorite way to do that is to tuck into a good book. Below are a few books that are perfect for doing just that.

ast Friday, iconic hip-hop group, A Tribe Called Quest, released their final album, “We got it from Here… Thank You 4 Your service.” It serves as a capstone to the group’s legendary career, which has spanned off-and-on over three decades.

This past weekend, Sheila Chukwulozie ’17E performed her Theater and Dance thesis called “portrait | wound | fragment*,” largely created and acted out in collaboration with Amir Hall ’17 and a few friends. On the Amherst website, she describes her project: “[My performance is] an exploration of pain and fear that live in memory and appear in reflection.

Splashed with a soft, cotton red and superimposed by a lonesome ice skate, the front flap of the 12th issue of “The Common” speaks of a coolly detached professionalism that attends the small, physical body of this publication in sight and feel. It is specifically that misleading nonchalance that may incline the potential reader to think that the skate emblemizes some central mystery that the pages will slowly investigate and resolve. At least, it points to an unrelated but nonetheless unifying ambition that informs the prose, poetry and ponderings contained within.

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