The Mead Art Museum held their Community Day for the Spring Semester, called “Fool Mead Once” on April 1, 2017. After entering the Mead that afternoon, I was immediately handed a miniature magnifying glass and a booklet advertising a scavenger hunt being held for that day. There were children constructing flipbooks and a few signs pointing me in the direction of the highlighted exhibits, Kota Ezawa’s “The Garden Revisited,” along with a series of short animated films dating back to the beginning of the 20th century.

Q: How did you start dancing and come to where you are now?
A:
I started dancing at 3 and was a tap dancer and an African dancer at a center for arts of the African diaspora. And I just kept on tapping up to the level that they said if I were to take any more classes I should start doing modern and jazz. So I kept tumbling into dance and trying different genres and never really stopped.

On February 24, celebrated bassist Thundercat released his third studio album, “Drunk.” Thundercat is renowned for not only his solo works but also his collaborations with producer Flying Lotus and rapper Kendrick Lamar. “Drunk” continues Thundercat’s record of success, although it departs slightly from some of his more intense work in the past. In “Drunk,” Thundercat prefers a laidback funky vibe, which he infuses with R&B and rap. What really makes the album unique and interesting, however, is Thundercat’s sense of humor.

Gabby Edzie ’17 is a senior English major writing a creative thesis. As she nears it's final deadline, I had the chance to sit down with her and ask a few questions regarding her trajectory through the English major along with her creative writing process. As Gabby aptly observes, one of the most prized and influential aspects of the English major, and life at Amherst in general, is the opportunity to sit down with peers different from yourself and get to know each other, share thought processes and hopefully think of something new.

Yagil Eliraz, stage director and professor of theatre and dance, facilitated the “Re-Imagining the Greeks” Conference.

In the Isabella Stewart Gardner Art Museum hang empty frames gaping like wounds. Some consider it distasteful to leave the frames, deprived of their original content, while others maintain that the museum has taken the proper course of action, not altering the exhibits in any manner. The ideal way to dissolve this dispute, of course, would be to have the stolen artwork returned to the museum. But after 27 years, this resolution seems less and less likely.

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