Last week, indie-rock band Foxygen released their fourth official album, “Hang.” The album follows their popular 2013 album, “We Are the 21st Century Ambassadors of Peace & Magic,” and their less well-received 2014 album, “…And Star Power.” “Hang” is the title of the last track on their previous album. However, the relationship between the previous album and the most recent release does not seem so literal, in terms of content.

Released Nov. 11, “Arrival” is a science-fiction film based on Ted Chiang’s short story, “Story of Your Life,” The film, directed by Denis Villenueve (Prisoners, Sicario) and starring Amy Adams and Jeremy Renner is an absolute triumph.
“Arrival” is one of the best movies of the year; it is a thinking person’s science fiction film in the same vein as “Interstellar,” “2001: A Space Odyssey” and “Close Encounters of the Third Kind.”

Jonathan Jackson ’17 and Hoang Thu An ’18 participated in Visiting Professor Amanda Herman’s Five College advanced art seminar course: “Make it Public: Art and Social Practice” about socially engaged art. The course has students from all five colleges who were chosen by the art departments at their schools for their exemplary work. For the course, each student proposed and implemented an original social practice art project that explore themes of identity, gender, race, mental health, human perceptions, feelings and more.

Following his hit singles “Starboy,” “False Alarm,” “Party Monster” and “I Feel It Coming,” Canadian R&B singer, The Weeknd, has released his highly anticipated third studio album, “Starboy.” The album follows the wildly popular success of his last album “Beauty Behind the Madness,” and, like “Beauty,” “Starboy” seems to possess the right recipe for making the top charts. The Weeknd continues to move farther away from the dark, moody R&B of his “Trilogy” mixtapes and further into the realm of pop music. However, “Starboy” is by no means a bland, mainstream pop album.

Lauren Carter ’17 is a math and theatre and dance major whose senior thesis will be an adaptation of Charles Mee’s “Big Love.” Her acting thesis will be directed by visiting theatre and dance professor Yagil Eliraz. The show will premiere in February with rehearsals beginning during interterm. I had the chance to talk with Carter about her hopes for her thesis before auditions are held later this week.

It’s no secret that Marvel movies tend to fall into storytelling ruts. There will always be a love interest, a snarky hero, a big fight scene, a sequel hook, etc. So imagine my surprise when I saw “Doctor Strange,” and it turned out to be one of the most clever comic book movies with an impressive, definite awareness of the genre’s general shortcomings.

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