Alexander Pushkin is Russia’s national poet, and “Eugene Onegin” is his most resonant masterpiece. It is no easy feat to transfer the life of poetry to the stage, but it was the burden director Rimas Tuminas had to bear in his much-anticipated and much-acclaimed reimagination of Pushkin’s seminal poem. The production, shown in Amherst Cinema, lasts a little under two hundred minutes, and in that time presents a jarringly contorted vision of the world of “Onegin,” one in which regret mangles its chronology.

Before Polina Barskova began to read her poems this past Sunday afternoon at the Jones Library in Amherst, she said something very wise: “Poetry is not to be understood but to be dealt with.” This comment proved to be especially fitting, at least for me, as she continued to read three of her wonderful poems in the original Russian — a language completely foreign to me — along with the accompanying English translations.

Black studies and Spanish double major Christine Croasdaile ’17 wrote a thesis, which examines hip-hop in socialist Cuba. Croasdaile traveled to Cuba for a second time over interterm to conduct interviews, examining how an art form of racial expression exists in a place where race is both “seen and unseen.”

On March 24, D.C.-based rapper GoldLink released his debut studio album “At What Cost.” The album follows two singles, “Meditation” and the widely popular “Crew.” The 2015 XXL freshman has also released two moderately successful mixtapes, so he has the background to debut as a practiced rapper with his own trademark flow and soulfulness. However, rather than rely on his tested formula in “At What Cost,” GoldLink moves to expand his scope by changing up and adding new elements to his style.

With streaming services at peak popularity, binge-watching has become the primary way most Americans consume media, and thus network television has begun a steady decline. Networks such as ABC, CBS and NBC have grown concerned for their futures as Netflix and Hulu increase their amount of original content every year. With the exception of networks such as the CW and Fox, networks are eager for a steady supply of tent-pole shows guaranteed to have viewers tune in weekly. NBC may have found that tentpole with their new family drama “This Is Us,” which just wrapped its first season.

On Saturday night, during the performance by the Quicksilver Baroque Ensemble, I realized just how strange the modern attitude towards classical music is. I use classical in the sense that it is old and instrumental non-pop music. The genre is technically baroque rather than classical. Although it is stated in the programs that the members of Quicksilver are considered “rock stars within the early music scene,” the performance felt especially formal, though I suspect this was no fault of the performers. I sat in the front row and experienced an anxious girl’s worst nightmare.

The Mead Art Museum held their Community Day for the Spring Semester, called “Fool Mead Once” on April 1, 2017. After entering the Mead that afternoon, I was immediately handed a miniature magnifying glass and a booklet advertising a scavenger hunt being held for that day. There were children constructing flipbooks and a few signs pointing me in the direction of the highlighted exhibits, Kota Ezawa’s “The Garden Revisited,” along with a series of short animated films dating back to the beginning of the 20th century.

Pages