In most cases, the story a father tells his children about how he met their mother is fairly brief, consisting of an explanation of where and when he met her, how he managed to win her over and how long it took before they were married. Played by Josh Radnor, Ted Mosby — protagonist of CBS’s hit sitcom, “How I Met Your Mother” — has something very different in mind, however, when he sits his teenaged son and daughter down in the year 2030 to tell them the story of how he met their mother.

“Tinker, tailor, soldier, sailor —
Rich man, poor man, beggar man, thief.”

There is something sinister beneath the superficial innocence of this traditional British counting rhyme. Or perhaps the very fact that I think so speaks to the influence of author John le Carré and his classic 1974 spy thriller, “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy.”

Academics are, of course, the priority in our lives as proud Lord Jeffs, but sex should be important, too. Sex, dating, relationships and hooking up are all amazing and deserve more credit on campus — or rather, more attention.

Dressing like you know what you are doing and dressing effortlessly are not mutually exclusive. Being crisp, comfortable and casual are not synonymous with dressing like the world is your gym. And there is nothing wrong with caring about how you look. Men’s casual is easy, relaxed and incredibly simple to set up.

This week I’m going to write about old news. True, I could write about Facebook going public or RIM changing captains or Apple defending its manufacturing practices. I could list off another five tips or recommend a program or remind you all to back up your hard drives. But I’m going to write about old news because it’s about time it stopped being old news.

A seven-year gap is not long enough for Alexander Payne to erase his penchant for contemporary satire nor alter his signature style. With “The Descendants,” his first directorial feature since the now legendary independent hit “Sideways,” an Academy-Award winning black comedy released in 2004, the Payne formula seems to be working again. The question is: Have we had enough?

Despite my appreciation of music and almost-unhealthy habit of listening to it while doing just about anything, I am often accused of not appreciating newer music enough. However, my complaint is not with new music in general; I just wish that the most popular artists were also the best. Unlike in the 1960s and early 1970s, when the Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, Bob Dylan, Marvin Gaye, the Rolling Stones and Black Sabbath were among the biggest artists in the world as well as the best, nowadays it seems that one has to cut through much more in order to find the diamonds in the rough.

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