Over the past two decades, video games have ascended from being a subculture to becoming one of the biggest entertainment industries of our generation. Many of us enjoy AAA titles, such as Call of Duty, Super Mario Bros. or Grand Theft Auto. In the past few years, however, the industry has witnessed an explosion of small developers producing indie games, exploring innovative new game concepts and offering these hand-crafted experiments at low prices.

Let’s face it. Even without knowing anything about “The Vagina Monologues,” the fact that it is about vaginas is enough to know that we are dealing with some heavy topics here. It seems like the concept of femininity, of womanhood, is incomplete without a conversation about sex. And when we say sex, we mean sex as power, as rape and abuse, as tangible proof that women are still being treated unfairly.

If you’ve frequented the Internet in the last few weeks, particularly the usual suspects of Facebook, Tumblr and Twitter, then chances are you not only know about “The Hunger Games” movie hype but also the related racial controversy. For those of you still in the dark: the adaptation of the first book in Suzanne Collins’ wildly popular series hit theaters March 23. The futuristic film, superficially about “kids killing kids,” has drawn attention for its commercial success, political message and faithfulness to the book.

Writing on a film that makes more money in its opening weekend than the combined domestic box office of all the films I have reviewed for The Student in over a year is quite a departure for me in many ways. For one, instead of having an entire theater to myself (or so I used to pretend), I had to swim in a sea of fresh, glowing teenagers whose popcorn crunching rivaled their pre-show chatter.

I have a brother headed off to college in fall, so he’s started thinking about what sort of computer he needs. Over break, we shopped around an Apple Store for an hour or so, comparing screen sizes and specifications. And, resident tech nerd that I am, I asked my brother a few questions about what he uses a computer for in order to get an idea of what he needed. He responded with the usual suspects: writing papers, browsing the web, listening to music and watching movies. In short, he fits the standard user profile.

In January, British newspaper The Guardian published an article titled “Rock music’s death knell has yet to toll.” By my own estimation, rock music, if not dead, is at least flat lining in popularity. But I don’t blame people who choose to listen to pop over rock today.

On Thursday, March 8, you might have seen a group of people running around campus in capes and masks offering triangular cookies to people who happened to pass by. For the majority of people at this college, this sight was probably confusing. One of the benefits of going to a college that is not entirely homogenous is having the opportunity to learn about different cultures and traditions from our peers. Here is a list of various holidays and traditions that you may be unfamiliar with if you do not practice the religion.

Purim, the Jewish holiday