A few weeks ago a Best Buy employee released a photo of what seemed to be cover art for the upcoming game Assassin’s Creed III. It pictured an assassin in white, reminiscent of previous protagonists but with a colonial edge. In one hand he held a shortened musket and in the other a tomahawk. A wooden bow and quiver of arrows were strapped over his waistcoat. And somewhere off behind him fluttered the 13-starred flag of the Continental Army.

“White Collar” is a television show about an ex-convict named Neal Caffrey, played by Matt Bomer, who is offered a chance to mitigate his jail sentence by working for the FBI. He puts his expert knowledge of the underground world of art theft and forgery to good use when he becomes an adviser to special agent Peter Burke, played by Tim DeKay. As Caffrey attempts to acclimate to the world of the FBI, the viewer is forced to acknowledge the tension between his past and his present, creating an interesting dilemma that unfolds within each episode and across the series as a whole.

The timeline began exactly half a century ago, when the first volume of Mary Norton’s “The Borrowers” series was published. Followed by five sequels, the children fantasy novel spun a plethora of film and TV adaptations, yet each, in some way or another, failed to revive the crystal-clear innocence that made the series a sensation. Meanwhile Isao Takahata and Hayao Miyazaki, two young Japanese animation artists took notice and decided to render the series their way.

Twelve years ago in a neighborhood in Addis Ababa, the capital city of Ethiopia, a project called “Sudden Flowers” to collect the unheard and unseen stories of Ethiopian youth was born. Part of this exhibition, created by the College’s current Artist-In-Residence Eric J. Gottesman, is currently displayed in the Eli Marsh gallery.

On Feb. 29, Davy Jones of the Monkees passed away due to a heart attack. While not many people will know the Monkees by name — though most probably know their biggest hit “I’m a Believer” — their influence can still be felt. Their brand of supremely lighthearted (and light-weight), ridiculously optimistic (to some, cringe-inducing) and exceptionally catchy music struck a sound somewhat between the Beatles and the Beach Boys, and by ultimately dropping any pretense of being a “serious” musical act, they went the route of being as purely pop as possible.

Reading written work in a web browser is old-fashioned. [No, it isn’t…] Saving an article for later requires storing the link or keeping the tab open, and sharing it requires pasting it into a text or an email. As articles update, we click through different sites and pages sorting out what’s new and what we’ve read, often running up against subscription walls or dead links. In short, it makes you want to just pick up a newspaper at Val.

And so, I present three helpful little tools to make digital reading a bit simpler:

Simin and Nader are married. Simin and Nader want a divorce. There is a simple solution to this problem, yes? Get a divorce. Huzzah, we’re done! Boy, that was a short movie.

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