The snowstorm tattered many of the trees on campus, leaving most of the quads in

After dodging a bullet two months ago when Hurricane Irene blew by leaving the College relatively unscathed, Amherst bit a bullet over the weekend, as an October Nor’easter pummeled the campus with record amounts of snow.

Good morning. I’m honored and moved by the greetings, by your presence, the presence of our trustees, faculty, staff, students. And by the way, students, after the dancing last night, it’s good that I received a cane.

I’m delighted to have my nephew, my closest friends, my colleagues from all over the country with me on this occasion.
I want also to acknowledge the three former chairs of the board of Amherst’s trustees — Amos Hostetter ’58, Spike Beitzel ’50 and Chuck Longsworth ’51. Thank you for honoring me with your presence.

On Oct. 5, students, professors and other members of the local community took part in the “Occupy Amherst” march. Chanting slogans such as “We are the 99 percent” and “Down with Wall Street,” demonstrators protested against what they saw as unfair political and economic inequality. The demonstration was inspired by the Occupy Wall Street (OWS) protests in New York City, and came as part of thousands of other such “occupations” around the world.

After a festive inauguration weekend, President Biddy Martin enjoyed a productive second faculty meeting as the official College president last Tuesday, Oct. 18, in Converse Hall. The faculty approved 15 new courses for the spring semester, discussed the continuation of the capital campaign and the creation of a new fundraising program. Most importantly, they began the debate about the future diversification of the faculty.

Starting this Interterm, Amherst College Emergency Medical Service (ACEMS) will begin giving up-front tuition assistance to students who cannot afford the costs of the Interterm EMT course. ACEMS is a student-staffed and student-administered organization that provides emergency medical response, at no cost, to any member of the campus community at any hour, any day.

Brigitte Libby is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics. She received a B.A. in Classics from Columbia College and a Ph.D. in Classical Philology and Literature from Princeton University. Her research focuses on Latin literature.

How did you begin studying Classics, and what made you decide to pursue it?

Photo by Meghna Sridhar '14

Posters, emails, postcards, Facebook event pages, statuses and videos bombarded the freshman class last week with one clear message: “Vote for me!”

After a rigorous advertising campaign by the Association of Amherst Students (AAS) Elections Committee, the Class of 2015 had a record number of candidates in the first-year Senate elections, with 18 students running on the ballot.

Pages