Residents of Charles Drew House held the college’s first ever Charles Drew Day on Thursday, Dec. 4 to honor Charles Drew ’26, an alumnus who is notable for being a black member and pioneer of the medical profession.

“Charles Drew Day is meant to celebrate the life and accomplishments of Dr. Charles Drew in the face of adversity. We hope to spread awareness of his life’s mission, how it relates to Charles Drew House, and why his life matters to us today,” said Bessie Birhanu ’17, Resident Counselor of Drew House.

A group of four students recently started Amherst Women in Finance, Economics and STEM, a club for female students interested in or already pursuing a degree in quantitative fields. STEM is an acronym for science, technology, engineering and math.

Economics and math major Ali Rohde ’16 said she had been thinking about possible ways to encourage more women to enter typically male-dominated fields. She wanted to foster a comfortable environment in which female students could readily see female upperclassmen and professors in quantitative fields as role models.

Several hundred people gathered in the Powerhouse on Saturday, Dec. 6 for La Causa’s 17th annual Voices for the Voiceless spoken word event, New England’s largest spoken word concert.

Nationally recognized speakers such as Slam Champions, White House Champions of Change awardees, HBO Def Poetry speakers and Sonia Sanchez, the college’s own first female African American professor, were among the list of seven performers at the concert.

On Sept. 22, Amit Gupta ’02 was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia. Four days later, he started treatment. Gupta learned that the average cure rate, or average rate of being alive and in remission at the five-year mark, was only 35 percent without a transplant. With a bone marrow transplant, however, the cure rate doubled. That is when the problems arose.

At the start of their last meeting of the semester, the faculty took a moment to acknowledge Professors Richard Goldsby and Lawrence Babb, of the Biology and Anthropology departments, respectively, who are both retiring at the end of the semester after distinguished and lengthy careers.

Much of the meeting thereafter focused on the increased accreditation demands of the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC), which is one of six regional associations providing the more than 3,000 institutions of higher learning with their accreditation.

In an effort to increase transparency between the Amherst Association of Students (AAS) and the College community, the AAS is working to move more of its budget information online, making it more open and accessible to the public.

Splash landed on the College’s campus this past Saturday, inviting middle and high school students to a day of unique classes with a curriculum created and taught by undergraduates. The College is among the dozens of institutions across the nation to host the program.

The event was a student-run production, designed and operated by members of the EDU, a campus organization that is part of the national education reform movement. Attendees of the event included home-schooled students, as well as students from charter, public and private schools throughout the Pioneer Valley.