The student-led “Being Human in STEM” (HSTEM) program, which was developed to promote discussion and research on inclusiveness as well as the role of personal identities and diversity within the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, will offer a course for students in Spring 2018.

The Women’s and Gender Center (WGC) has just implemented its “Talk Back” program after a pilot last year.

The program is an informal and student-run series of dialogues focusing on contemporary topics in pop culture and current events that are related to gender. WGC staff host one Talk Back each semester and can co-lead the program with another WGC staffer or with someone from another resource center.

The most recent talk, titled “Trans Identity and Recent Events,” was held last Thursday Nov. 2 in the WGC in Keefe Campus Center.

Award-winning professor and author Kwame Anthony Appiah gave a talk titled “How to Not Think About Race, Culture and Class” on Thursday, Nov. 2, in Stirn Auditorium, during which he discussed the origins of perceptions of race, culture and class and offered an alternative lens.

Jun Hee Cho is an assistant professor of history. He completed his undergraduate study in Western history and Asian history at Seoul National University in South Korea, and he holds a Master of Philosophy and a Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Matthew Chow ’18 is an English and economics double major. His thesis examines the intersection of the Christian gospel and Shakespeare’s tragedies. His advisor is Professor Anston Bosman in the English Department.

The Office of Diversity and Inclusion (ODI) is holding a new series titled “AmherstChatBack: Dialoguing Across Difference” to provide a space for students to talk about differences and intersections in their lives. Co-facilitated by Dialogue Coordinator Ismaris K. Ocasio and Race, Gender and Sexuality Education Specialist Babyface Card in Keefe Campus Center, the first dialogue took place on Sept. 29 while the most recent dialogue on Friday, Oct. 27 — the fifth of seven — addressed nationality. Past topics have included class, gender, ability and sexuality.

Loretta Ross, a human and women’s rights activist who helped coin the term “reproductive justice,” spoke about the origins of the reproductive justice movement and how it can be used to dismantle white supremacy on Tuesday, Oct. 24. Her talk was part of Reproductive Justice Week, which was hosted by the Women and Gender Center and the student-run Reproductive Justice Alliance.

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