The college hired a new director of dining services this year, and along with this transition came a number of changes in the layout and structure of Valentine Dining Hall.

According to Joseph Flueckiger, who was hired in the spring of 2017, changes to the dining hall include expanding the fresh fruit display, opening a yogurt and fruit bar for breakfast, upgrading the spice station, installing temperature-controlled salad bar wells and removing salt and pepper shakers from dining tables so that the food can taste the way chefs intended.

President Biddy Martin sent a community-wide email on Sept. 5 condemning President Donald Trump’s decision to rescind Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). In her email, she emphasized the college’s commitment to recruiting and protecting students with DACA status.

The Amherst College Police Department announced on Monday, Sept. 11 that two juveniles unaffiliated with the college were responsible for tying a rope into a noose on Pratt Football Field. The discovery of the noose on Sept. 5 touched off a week of student action and administrative communication condemning the incident.

The college’s police chief, John Carter, notified the college community of the incident in an email on Sept. 7. The noose had been shaped from a rope used for athletic training.

The Folger Shakespeare Library, administered by the college, was awarded a grant in August by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for $1.5 million to fund a four-year collaborative research project called “Before Farm to Table: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures.”

When Claire Cho ’20 received her financial aid package in early July, she was shocked — her expected family contribution had doubled “without any indication that it would,” she said.

After conversing with friends and peers, she realized that a number of students’ expected family contributions had changed dramatically since their first year.

“People who were really close with me, we were really unhappy with the way Financial Aid was handling it,” she said.

“It didn’t seem like just one or two people,” Cho added. “It seemed much more of a trend.”

Amherst College welcomed 473 new students from around the country and the world on Tuesday, Aug. 29, kicking off the college’s orientation week, which included familiar programs from years past as well as new changes and improvements.
According to the Office of Admission, members of the class of 2021 were selected from a record-setting pool of 9,285 students, up 10 percent from last year. Of those applicants, 1,198, or 12.9 percent, were offered admission. One hundred and seventy-two students were admitted through early decision.

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