Meredith Rollins was named editor in chief of Redbook, a Hearst magazine, almost three years ago after spending her career working for a variety of magazines. Her passion for good content and willingness to try new things has guided her throughout her career in the so-called “dying” magazine industry. The English and French major started to make her way up the publishing ladder immediately after graduating and has never looked back.

Imagine waking up one morning, walking into Val and seeing the new issue of The Amherst Student on the newspaper rack.

You grab a copy and start flipping through it. Much to your surprise, there’s a letter from the president saying that the college is shut down for the rest of the semester until he can make a final decision on whether women will be allowed to attend.

This is just one of the pranks journalist Jim Warren ’74 and his friends played during their time at Amherst as a part of the group they coined Rubber Chicken Enterprises.

David Sutphen '91 has moved around in different industries over the years, jumping from politics to entertainment to education. He currently works as chief communications and engagement officer at 2U, an education company focusing on providing online master’s degree programs. Sutphen was appointed to the company’s board of trustees in 2014 and remains active on the boards of nonprofit groups U.S. Soccer Foundation, GetSchooled and Business Forward.

Finding a Place Within an Education Setting

Govern met with me at 9 a.m. on a Tuesday morning at a coffee shop in downtown Boston. We talked for nearly an hour and a half before she headed off to work. I was surprised by the flexibility her work schedule allows her.

This, she said, is just one small benefit out of the many rewards of working for a nonprofit.

Govern works as a staff attorney for the National Environmental Law Center.

History and American Studies major Shin came to Amherst as an unassuming but bright and curious student. His academic pursuits led him to a PhD in history from Columbia University last year, and he currently teaches at Bates but will be moving to a tenure-track position at the University of Michigan next year.

Shin describes his passion for the work he does not as a primarily knowledge-driven endeavor, but rather as a way in which he can replicate the sort of relationships and impact that the “wonderful” professors at Amherst had on him as a student.

Christine Bader ’93 is a corporate idealist. Though she’s seen the best and the worst at the world’s largest corporations, including e-commerce company Amazon and oil and gas company BP, she believes that big companies can be “a force for good.”

Student teaching assistants from various academic departments gathered on Sunday, Sept. 24 for a training session that covered issues such as effective teaching practices and inclusivity in classrooms. The training session was part of the college’s goal to reexamine the ways in which faculty and other educators interact with students on campus.

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