In what might be the most dramatic standoff in recent AAS history, the Senate and College administration continue to stand at odds over recent social policy decisions.

Last year, then-AAS Senator (and now current President) Romen Borsellino started a column in The Student to keep the student body in touch with the weekly doings of the AAS. Romen sensed (correctly) that few outside of the Senate understood what went on in Senate meetings, and even fewer believed that the AAS was serving a real, valuable purpose on campus.

It is Sept. 14, 2011, and we are at war. I’m not talking about the wars in Iraq or Afghanistan; the secret CIA-lead wars in Yemen, Pakistan, or Somalia (and who knows where else); or even the “War on Terror.” No, the United States is in the middle of a civil war — a political civil war, ironically fought along many of the same geographic, racial and ideological lines that still stem from the last. Although the consequences are perhaps not as clear-cut as the physical division of our nation, they are nonetheless grave.

What was interesting to note about President Obama’s speech last Thursday night was that it was perhaps more partisan than any speech he’s given so far. There were both direct and indirect, subtle and obvious attacks on the Republican Party and the Tea Party. The President attacked openly the theoretic foundation of the Republican movement with his talk about the reduction of the size of government. Moreover, his tone was sterner and more aggressive than in previous speeches. He was defiant...why?

Hello, as a member of the Employee Council I am a bit dismayed to see you describe the Search Committee as “composed of students, alumni and faculty” in your very nice article about Biddy Martin, when the Committee also included members of the College’s staff and administration. This seems a small error, but I assure you that for the non-faculty employees who have worked very hard for inclusion in the governance of the College, recognition of our part in Biddy’s selection is extremely important.

This past Sunday, Americans gathered to memorialize the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11, 2001. As a nation, we collectively remembered the shock, the anger, the grief and the loss felt when we saw the World Trade Center towers collapse – but we also remember the solidarity emerging in the midst of that dark day.

This is the twenty-second column I’ve written for this newspaper, and the last. Over the past 19 months and 21 columns, I’ve tried to treat my section of the opinion page appropriately. Campus columnist is not a lofty position, so I’ve kept my tone more or less light. But at the same time, not everyone is given ink to spill, so I’ve made efforts at being meaningful.

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