We live in a postmodern society: in fact, in the most promising one that has ever existed. We have cured epidemics, created previously unimaginable transportation and communications systems, conceived methods of going to different worlds and have seen life spans and life qualities go up at near exponential rates.

First, I would like to thank those who voted in the school–wide referendum last week. The proposal to build a charging station and purchase a Chevy Volt for ACEMS passed with an overwhelming majority, with 82 percent of voters supporting the endeavor. Ian Hatch ’14 and I look forward to quickly finishing this project.

I caught a surprising amount of flack for the fact that I named abortion as my number one issue in this election. To leftists and even some conservatives, that marks me as duplicitous, as if I’m trying to use abortion as an issue to force people with a moral conscience to support certain candidates.

Leaders face numerous challenges. One challenge that seems to escape the glamour of recognition, however, is the challenge of giving up one’s own leadership. This is one of the toughest challenges any leader can face, and it is the final struggle. After he has battled all the external forces that prevent him from achieving his goal, this leader realizes that he himself is an obstacle to progress.

Over the past few weeks, we’ve seen a large number of heated debates sparking around campus — most of them starting with, or popularized through articles that appeared on The Student website. These articles have not just received a large number of views and comments but have people talking everywhere from Facebook to Val.

Dear Mr. Borsellino and the Amherst Student Body,

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