Last Friday evening, from 7 to 8 p.m., a number of Amherst students put on a beautiful performance of Claude Debussy’s musical works in the Mead Art Museum. The event, presented by the Amherst College Student Chamber Musicians, included eleven students, each of whom played or sang a different piece.

This performance took place in the historic Rotherwas room and was advertized on the event page as being “in conjunction with the current exhibition in the room ‘From the Picturesque to the Modern Vision: Landscape Painting in Europe throughout the Ages.’”

Whether you’re returning home for Thanksgiving or not, there were certainly be plenty of downtime next week, and if you’re anything like me, part of this time will be spent catching up on all the shows that have fallen by the wayside as a result of endless piles of work. Often, some of the best shows on Netflix and Amazon get lost amidst the countless promotions for the latest original series and suggestions for shows you’ve seen too many times. Here is a compilation of some of the lesser known shows out there for you to consider next time you want to enjoy good television.

This past Saturday, the Mead Art Museum hosted its bi-annual “Community Day at the Mead.” The event featured a variety of activities designed for both young children and college students.

The event was representative of the Mead’s prioritization of community engagement with art over the traditional stuffiness associated with art museums. The Mead made its art accessible to the community by having Amherst student actors explain pieces and answer questions in a “living arts” tour during the event.

This Friday night, Marsh Coffee Haus II took place in Marsh House from 8 to 10 p.m.. Throughout the night, various artists performed acts of different genres, including poetry, prose, acoustic covers of songs, self-written songs, jazz, comedy and interpretive dance. The night was a relaxing event that provided the various talented artists on campus a platform to share their work with the community.

Saya Woolfalk’s project, “The Empathetics,” highlights issues of gender, culture, identity, technological advances and commercialization in an innovative series of works that combine technology with art and storytelling. The exhibit, featured in the Mead Museum, examines the lives of women, called Empathetics, in a fictional world where they can modify their genetics at will and fuse with plants.