The holidays are just around the corner, and the festive spirit is on full display just about everywhere. Well, everywhere except college. A different season is on the horizon here — exam season. While the holidays are a time for cheer, exams can be quite rough, to put it lightly. As the rest of the world busily decorates and sips eggnog, students must buckle down and study. With the holidays seeming so close, yet so far away, you might not be ready to turn on Michael Bublé and Mariah Carey just yet.

Last Friday, California-based rock band Weezer released their 11th album, “Pacific Daydream.” Fans have been anticipating — or rather dreading — this new installment in Weezer’s discography since the first single “Feels Like Summer” was released back in March. Weezer and its frontman Rivers Cuomo have a tumultuous history; the bands first two albums released in the 90’s are recognized as some of the best rock albums of the decade. After that, however, its output has ranged from pretty good to really bad.

ast Friday, iconic hip-hop group, A Tribe Called Quest, released their final album, “We got it from Here… Thank You 4 Your service.” It serves as a capstone to the group’s legendary career, which has spanned off-and-on over three decades.

Coming off of a lengthy hiatus, Bon Iver released their first album in five years on Friday, Sept. 30. The album, titled “22, A Million,” has been highly anticipated following the release of singles “22 (OVER S∞∞N),” “10 d E A T h b R E a s T ⚄⚄” and “33 “GOD”.” Over the course of their career, Bon Iver has received critical acclaim for their first two albums, “For Emma, Forever Ago” and “Bon Iver, Bon Iver,” winning the Grammy for Best New Artist in 2011.

After about a month’s delay, Travis Scott finally debuted his highly anticipated sophomore album “Birds in the Trap Sing McKnight.” Scott’s previous projects have included two mixtapes and the critically acclaimed “Rodeo,” which propelled Scott into stardom on the current hip-hop scene. On “Birds,” Scott continues in his style of “southern trap.” Although, “Birds” does not necessarily distinguish itself immediately, featuring the same vocoding and auto-tune that Travis’ vocals experienced on “Rodeo,” fans expecting a sequel to “Rodeo” may be disappointed.