The Amherst Student’s editors, writers and staff have long prided ourselves on the independent nature of our student-run newspaper — since 1868, in fact. By “independent,” we mean that The Student was not funded by the school and that our all-volunteer team has worked hard to cover our own costs of printing, shipping to subscribers and distribution. While many other schools’ newspapers either started as school-funded projects or shifted to this model, The Student had managed to maintain its independence.

The Amherst College Police Department announced on Monday, Sept. 11 that two juveniles unaffiliated with the college were responsible for tying a rope into a noose on Pratt Football Field. The discovery of the noose on Sept. 5 touched off a week of student action and administrative communication condemning the incident.

The college’s police chief, John Carter, notified the college community of the incident in an email on Sept. 7. The noose had been shaped from a rope used for athletic training.

Amherst College welcomed 473 new students from around the country and the world on Tuesday, Aug. 29, kicking off the college’s orientation week, which included familiar programs from years past as well as new changes and improvements.
According to the Office of Admission, members of the class of 2021 were selected from a record-setting pool of 9,285 students, up 10 percent from last year. Of those applicants, 1,198, or 12.9 percent, were offered admission. One hundred and seventy-two students were admitted through early decision.

minjee kim

Rarely does one find an undergraduate scientist and future physician with a list of high science honors and accomplishments. Rarer still is such a scientist who also has a deep passion for providing support and resources to help her peers. Yet, this elusive ideal describes Minjee Kim perfectly. The Seoul-born, Seattle-raised biophysics major has left a mark in the hearts of faculty and students who have experienced her simultaneous dedication to scientific excellence and to helping her fellow students advance in their own intellectual journeys.

Robert Teranishi, professor of social science and comparative education at the University of California, Los Angeles, gave a talk about diversity in higher education on Tuesday, March 21. Teranishi’s talk, titled “Call to Action: Leveraging the Power of Diversity to Achieve Academic Excellence,” focused on misunderstandings of Asian American and Pacific Islanders due to overgeneralized data.

President Biddy Martin sent an email to the college community on Wednesday, Nov. 16 condemning two unauthorized posters discovered in McGuire Life Sciences Building on the preceding Tuesday. The posters depicted ideas related to phrenology, a study that uses differences in skull shapes and sizes to justify racial disparities. Phrenology has been widely discredited as an obsolete and unscientific defense of racism.

“I condemn the racism and cynical mean-spiritedness of those who hung the posters in the strongest possible terms,” Martin wrote in her statement.

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