I am still trying to figure out what exactly “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead” is about. But perhaps that in itself is exactly what the play is about.

The Green Room’s rendition of Tom Stoppard’s quirky, absurdist piece, which is a modern extrapolation on the eponymous “Hamlet” characters, embraced the original’s questioning and ambiguous air in its production last Saturday and Sunday night.

The show was put on by a small cast and crew of under 20 people. Senior Michael Barnett directed the group after pitching the play to The Green Room’s executive board.

This past weekend, the Amherst women’s cross country team travelled to Bates to compete in the NESCAC championship race, where the Mammoths claimed both the individual title and a fifth place overall. The Mammoths, with 133 points, finished just behind the hosts.

Nicky Roberts ’18 finished first for her second week in a row after coming in the top spot at the Little Three Championship. She raced into first with a time of 21:19.9, making her the eighth woman in the program’s history to claim an individual NESCAC Championship title.

Govern met with me at 9 a.m. on a Tuesday morning at a coffee shop in downtown Boston. We talked for nearly an hour and a half before she headed off to work. I was surprised by the flexibility her work schedule allows her.

This, she said, is just one small benefit out of the many rewards of working for a nonprofit.

Govern works as a staff attorney for the National Environmental Law Center.

Last Friday, Sept. 29, Lehigh hosted the Paul Short Classic brown division 6k race. Amherst claimed fourth place out of the 20 schools in the Division II/III league. The meet is one of the largest in the nation, with 14 races and over 6,000 athletes coming from both college and high school.

The course was a challenging one for the runners, with grass throughout and a hilly terrain.

This fall’s political conversations and actions surrounding Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), Dreamers and the border wall have revived fears and questions of what our country would look like without immigrants.

Our minds first go to political questions of American life without immigrants, but how would America’s — and Amherst’s — culture change with the restriction and exclusion of immigrants?