Since its inception at Worcester Polytechnic Institute seven years ago, the Student Support Network program (SSN) has made its way to numerous college campuses throughout the country, Amherst included.

Two weeks ago, Amherst College received media attention when Newsweek covered the story of an e-mail that was sent to the student body prior to Homecoming weekend. The article, titled “College Warns of Drunk, Sexually Aggressive Alumni,” points to the offensively worded sections of the e-mail.

After months of uncertainty due to unforeseen construction difficulties, the College is finally moving forward with an updated plan to build a new science center on the east campus. On Oct. 11, the Board of Trustees approved a plan to raze the social dorms in order to make way for the new science center, which will be completed by the fall of 2018. The plan also provides for the construction of new permanent student housing south of Merrill, where the temporary dorms Plaza and Waldorf are currently located.

On Oct. 11, the Board of Trustees approved a new facilities plan which, among other things, called for the Social Dorms to be razed to make way for a new science center. The plan potentially kills two birds with one stone by ensuring Amherst remains competitive in undergraduate science and by dealing with the dilapidated Socials. While the Socials, at present, may be for many an important focal point for social life, these changes are long overdue.

Residential counselors received an email last week with information that they could then pass on to their residents regarding the upcoming Homecoming weekend. The following portion of this email, which was posted on the Facebook group Fixing Amherst College’s Sexual Violence Problem and then later quoted in a Newsweek article, sparked much controversy and discussion.

Most students have a favorite story of police breaking up a party they attended. Last year, one of my orchestra parties was broken up in Seelye. You may expect orchestra members to be crazy party animals, but (un)surprisingly the majority of orchestra party funds are used to purchase snacks and soda since most orchestra members do not drink. The image of a police officer in Seelye breaking up 35 orchestra members (some in tuxedos) eating cheese and crackers and drinking some alcohol makes most people laugh.

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