In light of the recent election and where Amherst stands in its history with diversity, allyship has never been more pertinent. There are individuals at this college who have been scarred by racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, anti-semitism, classicism, religious discrimination, xenophobia, etc. for most, if not all of their lives. There are also individuals on this campus who have never experienced any of those oppressions.

Lauren Carter ’17 is a math and theatre and dance major whose senior thesis will be an adaptation of Charles Mee’s “Big Love.” Her acting thesis will be directed by visiting theatre and dance professor Yagil Eliraz. The show will premiere in February with rehearsals beginning during interterm. I had the chance to talk with Carter about her hopes for her thesis before auditions are held later this week.

The Amherst women’s soccer team finished a very successful season last Saturday, Nov. 19. Though they lost their final match to William Smith 4-2, the purple and white finished with an impressive record of 17-3-1 overall and 8-1-1 in conference, while also boasting the 2016 NESCAC championship title.

In the most important meet of first-year Katherine Treanor’s storybook season, she proved that the success she has enjoyed all season was no fluke. Treanor managed to clinch 27th overall at an NCAA national championship meet that included 280 of the nation’s fastest collegiate runners.

The 2016 season came to a heartbreaking end for the Amherst men’s soccer team last weekend, as the purple and white fell to Brandeis University in penalty kicks in the NCAA Sweet 16. After battling back from a one goal deficit and dominating the stat sheet, Amherst was unable to get the result that they deserved and advance in tournament play.

It’s no secret that Marvel movies tend to fall into storytelling ruts. There will always be a love interest, a snarky hero, a big fight scene, a sequel hook, etc. So imagine my surprise when I saw “Doctor Strange,” and it turned out to be one of the most clever comic book movies with an impressive, definite awareness of the genre’s general shortcomings.

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