On February 24, celebrated bassist Thundercat released his third studio album, “Drunk.” Thundercat is renowned for not only his solo works but also his collaborations with producer Flying Lotus and rapper Kendrick Lamar. “Drunk” continues Thundercat’s record of success, although it departs slightly from some of his more intense work in the past. In “Drunk,” Thundercat prefers a laidback funky vibe, which he infuses with R&B and rap. What really makes the album unique and interesting, however, is Thundercat’s sense of humor.

Gabby Edzie ’17 is a senior English major writing a creative thesis. As she nears it's final deadline, I had the chance to sit down with her and ask a few questions regarding her trajectory through the English major along with her creative writing process. As Gabby aptly observes, one of the most prized and influential aspects of the English major, and life at Amherst in general, is the opportunity to sit down with peers different from yourself and get to know each other, share thought processes and hopefully think of something new.

Yagil Eliraz, stage director and professor of theatre and dance, facilitated the “Re-Imagining the Greeks” Conference.

In the Isabella Stewart Gardner Art Museum hang empty frames gaping like wounds. Some consider it distasteful to leave the frames, deprived of their original content, while others maintain that the museum has taken the proper course of action, not altering the exhibits in any manner. The ideal way to dissolve this dispute, of course, would be to have the stolen artwork returned to the museum. But after 27 years, this resolution seems less and less likely.

Watching porn at college always reminded me a little bit of Facebook stalking. Lots of people do it, many find it entertaining, and almost everyone would be embarrassed if someone caught them watching it. What’s different about porn is the way we talk about it — or maybe more importantly, the way we don’t. The porn industry is like the mafia boss of entertainment. It’s the most powerful player by far, but we feel afraid or ashamed to address it directly.

My parents emigrated from Lahore to Brooklyn, NY in the early 1990s. I’ve often imagined their arrival in the U.S.: they settled in a country far from home, where people who looked nothing like them spoke an unfamiliar language, with little in the way of a support system. When I imagine their difficulties, I’m impressed by their resilience. Today, Muslim immigrants like my parents are faced with unprecedented circumstances of danger, difficulty and hostility. More importantly, migrants are often members of the larger global working class, which involves them in even larger class struggles.

Robert Teranishi, professor of social science and comparative education at the University of California, Los Angeles, gave a talk about diversity in higher education on Tuesday, March 21. Teranishi’s talk, titled “Call to Action: Leveraging the Power of Diversity to Achieve Academic Excellence,” focused on misunderstandings of Asian American and Pacific Islanders due to overgeneralized data.