Walking through the stacks of Frost Library reminds us of the overwhelming volume of published material in the world. No matter how many classes we take, there are always more books we could read, more textbooks from which we can learn and more people to whom we can listen. There is so much we will not know simply because of limited time. However, the feeling of not knowing enough should not become a state of hopeless stagnation.

On Monday, Amherst College officially (and finally) announced its first-ever official mascot: the Mammoths. This change comes on the heels of the student body’s majority decision to reject the college’s long-time unofficial mascot, the Lord Jeff, because of Lord Jeffrey Amherst’s terrible and inhumane treatment of Native Americans. However, in terms of national attention, the controversy over the Lord Jeff is small potatoes compared to the argument over the Washington D.C. football team’s name.

Raheem Jackson ’17 is a black studies and sociology double major. His thesis examines black masculinity, specifically in female-headed households. His advisers are Professors of Black Studies John Drabinski and Rhonda Cobham-Sander.

President Biddy Martin and Association of Amherst Student (AAS) President Karen Blake ’17 addressed an audience of faculty and students at the college’s first State of the College Address on Wednesday, March 28 in Johnson Chapel.

The event was planned and created by AAS Senator Sade Green ’20 as apart of her senate project, a requirement that each AAS Senator create an initiative to benefit the student body.

Wake Forest University professor and former MSNBC host Melissa Harris-Perry presented a talk titled “Race, Gender and the Politics of Knowledge: Campus, Community, Congress” in Johnson Chapel on Monday, March 26.

Cornell Williams Brooks, president and CEO of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), spoke to members of the college community in Johnson Chapel on Friday, March 24.

In his talk, titled “A Woke Democracy,” Brooks discussed contemporary challenges that marginalized groups faced and the need for a multigenerational social justice movement. The event was free and open to the public, and Brooks’ talk was followed by a brief Q&A session.

"Decolonize Val," a student-led sit-in aiming to break down what organizers called the “toxic culture” of the back room in Valentine Dining Hall, took place during the evenings last week from March 27-31.

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