UMass Boston Professor of Philosophy Lynne Tirrell gave a talk titled “Toxic Speech” about linguistics and their societal influence on Thursday, April 20.

Tirrell studies the philosophy of language, politics of discourse and the ways that linguistic practices influence social justice or facilitate injustice. She is currently researching the power of linguistics in shaping social conditions that make genocide possible, focusing on the Rwandan genocide of the Tutsi people in 1994.

Eric Herbst, a professor of chemistry at the University of Virginia, held a seminar titled “Three Environments for Interstellar Chemistry: Gas, Dust and Ice” on Friday, April 21. He spoke about the species of molecule found in gases, dust and ice and the tools which scientists use to observe them.

The Amherst College Democrats organized a trip for 35 students to travel to Washington D.C. and participate in the March for Science demonstration on Saturday, April 22, which was also Earth Day.

The March for Science protests were organized to demonstrate support for science by a “diverse, nonpartisan group,” according to the movement’s official website.

My sister is a junior in high school, which means that this spring, she has begun the “College Process.” She’s been visiting many schools around the country and beginning to think about which ones she wants to apply to next fall. This process should be one of excitement, and to a degree, it is. Seeing a variety of college campuses is very fun, and fantasizing about where one will have their mind molded for four years is exhilarating. However, these days it seems that the College Process is a far more stressful experience than it is a positive one.

As we approach the end of the year, the campus seems to be brimming with nostalgia. Suddenly, the weather is nice again and we remember what it’s like to be here on the really good days. Commencement approaches and the “end” calls us to turn around and look backward. What do we see when we reflect on our experience? What constitutes the Amherst experience, and further, is there even such a thing? With our diverse student body, it is quite difficult to imagine a single Amherst experience.

Labor isn’t pretty. Amherst College is pretty — especially as it prepares to host the families of its graduating seniors, who will undoubtedly remember the beauty of the commencement ceremony, the speeches and campus aesthetics for a long time.

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been researching the meal plans offered at Amherst College. For me, it works — but for others, it doesn’t. Before I continue, I want to make this clear: I bring up these flaws because I love Amherst. I believe that critique strengthens institutions that pay attention and implement change. I want Amherst to flourish, but it can’t be done without addressing the problems that stunt its growth.