In what might be the most dramatic standoff in recent AAS history, the Senate and College administration continue to stand at odds over recent social policy decisions.

Last year, then-AAS Senator (and now current President) Romen Borsellino started a column in The Student to keep the student body in touch with the weekly doings of the AAS. Romen sensed (correctly) that few outside of the Senate understood what went on in Senate meetings, and even fewer believed that the AAS was serving a real, valuable purpose on campus.

Last Thursday the Association of Amherst Students (AAS) and the Dean of Students Office partnered to hold a meeting to discuss the impact of the new Massachusetts law on sprinkler systems in social facilities on The Amherst Parties (TAPs).
Because of the law, the basements of Crossett, Stone and Davis can no longer be used to host the college-sponsored parties.

Monday night’s Senate meeting ended with the ceremonial changing of the guard. As one Executive Board said their farewells, "clearly an emotional moment for guys like outgoing President Saumitra Thakur, who has spent pretty much every Monday night at a Senate Meeting for the past four years," the new officers were sworn in.

This Friday, the Student Body will elect a new Senate for the upcoming school year. Monday night’s meeting proved to me that the AAS is truly heading in a direction towards making student life issues a priority, which is something that I, and many others, have long hoped for. I hope to see a new Senate that continues this focus. Here are some things we talked about Monday night:

This Friday, the student body will have the opportunity to vote in a referendum on a new Constitution for the AAS. Today, the incumbent and incoming Presidents and the author of the new Constitution write to encourage you to vote ‘no’ in the referendum.