Scott Hunter ’64, who has a Masters of Theology and Masters of Rehabilitation, Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling, writes regarding athletics and substance abuse both in his personal life and at the College.

The recent report of the Special Oversight Committee on Sexual Misconduct at Amherst contains some good suggestions on how to improve the disciplinary system and the delivery of psychological and medical care to victims of rape, recommendations that are already being implemented. But in one important respect, the report is seriously flawed.

In the midst of an 11-game winning streak, the men’s basketball team certainly had a target on their back coming into this week. Since suffering their second loss of the season on Dec. 4, the Jeffs have been practically untouchable, inviting the extra attention of opponents seeking a big upset. Yet, Amherst has not been deterred, beating their opponents by an average of 16.5 points per game en route to one of the most impressive stretches in program history.

Since Amherst began, the College has developed two traditions — distinct from each other but both integral to the school’s character. One is a tradition of social reform, the other a tradition of cultural exclusion. The first embodies the sort of progressive ideals we try to instill in modern Americans, the other a retrograde carelessness about the sensitivities of people who fall outside narrow, old-school categories.

The Biology Department writes to The Student regarding an image found hanging in a College science facility. Signatories include Jill S. Miller, Chair of Biology, Ethan D. Clotfelter, Julie A. Emerson, Stephen A. George, Caroline E. Goutte, Ethan R. Graf, Michael E. Hood, Rachel A. Levin, Dominic L. Poccia, Alexandra E. Purdy, David I. Ratner, Ethan J. Temeles, Josef G. Trapani, and Patrick L. Williamson.

Authors: Barry O’Connell, James E. Ostendarp Professor of English; Karen Sanchez-Eppler, Professor of American Studies and English and Faculty Advisor to the Center for Community Engagement, and Chair of American Studies; Lisa T. Brooks, Associate Professor of English and American Studies; Kiara M. Vigil, Assistant Professor of American Studies.

On Dec. 6, 2012, scholars, students and tribal community members from across the country gathered in Cole Assembly Room for a day-long symposium to honor William Apess, a 19th-century Pequot preacher, activist and intellectual. Despite the silent, heavy presence of Jeffrey Amherst’s legacy, Native individuals and their non-Native colleagues and allies joined together to lighten that burden and celebrate Apess’s courage and eloquence in the face of adversity.